Legends & Folklore

An old photograph showing Sifu Wong (in his teens) performing a Hoong Ka kungfu set with his master, Sifu Lai Chin Wah, popularly known as Uncle Righteousness (middle behind in white T-shirt), looking on.

An art is best learnt in its culture. One remarkable difference between the culture of the east and the west is the respect shown to a master. In this connection I have little complaint because my students, from both the east and the west, generally show much respect to me. But I have met many eastern masters commenting on the lack of respect, sometimes utter disrespect, shown to them. Often it is because of the western students' ignorance of eastern ways rather than their willful discourtesy that their eastern masters of chi kung or kung fu (including taijiquan) regard as disrespect.


An art is best learnt in its culture. One remarkable difference between the culture of the east and the west is the respect shown to a master. In this connection I have little complaint because my students, from both the east and the west, generally show much respect to me. But I have met many eastern masters commenting on the lack of respect, sometimes utter disrespect, shown to them. Often it is because of the western students' ignorance of eastern ways rather than their willful discourtesy that their eastern masters of chi kung or kung fu (including taijiquan) regard as disrespect.


Sifu Wong receiving the "Qigong Master of the Year" award at the Second World Congress on Qigong in San Francisco, November 1997

Having a good master is definitely a tremendous blessing in kungfu, taijiquan and qigong training. As mediocre instructors are so common nowadays -- some even start to teach after having attended only a few week-end seminars -- finding a great master is like finding a gem in a haystack. Here are some guidelines to help you find one.
 

An Example of What He Teaches


An art is best learned in its culture. One remarkable difference between the culture of the east and the west is the respect shown to a master. In this connection I have little complaint because my students, from both the east and the west, generally show much respect to me. But I have met many eastern masters commenting on the lack of respect, sometimes utter disrespect, shown to them.


Once upon a time there was a man who, when he left home every morning, would tell his two wives that he wouldn't be home for lunch or dinner. He had to meet with some important business friends, or some high-ranking government officials, and they would wine and dine him after the meeting. Every night he would come home full and drunk, and would brag about how great the banquet was, or about the important people he had met at dinner.