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5 Main Hung Gar Forms

Discussion in 'Animal Forms & Styles' started by ThraxDalgren, Sep 11, 2002.

  1. Offline

    ThraxDalgren

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    I have a question to those who know anything about Hung Gar.

    I know there are 5 forms that are considered the core of Hung Gar.

    Lau Gar Kuen

    Gung Gi Fuk Fu Kuen

    5 animal/5 elements

    Tiger-Crane

    Iron Wire (aka Iron Thread)

    As you will notice the last three forms are listed in english because I do not know the cantonese (or whatever) saying for those forms. Does anyone know the proper names for 5animal/5elements, Tiger-Crane, and Iron Wire
  2. Offline

    fireinthewater

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    Iron Wire = TIET SIN KUEN

    Tiger Crane = Fu Hok Suerng Ying Kuen

    Oh yeah if you have good internet access you can see a part of iron wire set at http://quandoman.com/mgallery.htm the only difference is he calls it steel wire.
  3. Offline

    ThraxDalgren

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    Thanks FITW. Anyone know about 5 animal/5elements though

    And that is a big boy in those videos. He could probably be a pro body builder with a little work :)

    But yeah I heard that Iron Wire (aka Iron Thread, Steel Thread, etc etc) takes about 20-25 minutes to do (when done properly) and that it is almost entirely comprised of dynamic breathing/tension. OY that sounds like a toughie :(
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    li xiao long Bad Ass Mo Fo, retired.

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    My hung gar teacher was going through a form that contains 5 elements and fist forms, as well as "plum flower boxing" form. Dont think these were part of hung gar, but are nice to learn.

    The element/fist form looked a sh!t load like hsing i :)

    PS have a copy of plum flower boxing on video (he recorded it for me when i moved back to sheffield this summer). shame i cant copy it. Maybe when i get my pc fixed I can turn it into an mpeg or something.
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    befusan

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    five animal form

    The chinese name for the five animal form is Ng Ying Kuen.
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    Humble Son

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    hung gar forms

    5 animal/5 element set is: sup yin kuen

    tiger/crane set is: fu hok shuen ying kuen

    iron wire set is: tiet sid kuen

    Hope this helps you out in your journey
  7. Offline

    KitKamran

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    ......

    lau gar is a style in and of itself. The style more or less died out around the same time that Wong(Huang) Fei Hung lived. Since then it has been incorporated into the Hung Gar system.

    <--- not enitrely true, have been corrected, style is alive and well in england.

    As far as I know there are 4 pillars of hung gar, or, the 4 legs of our tiger :)

    Gung Gee Fok Fu Kuen (subduing and taming the tiger in an "I" pattern)

    Fu Hok Seung Ying Kuen (tiger crane set)

    Ng Ying Kuen (5 animals fist set)

    Tid Sin Kuen (Iron Thread/Wire set)

    Sup Ying Kuen is sort of a "hybrid" between the 5 animal fist set and the 5 elements fist set.

    --------

    Have to say though, the form I look most forward to learning has to be: Kun Lum Darn Gim Kuen(twin-edged straight mountain sword set :) )

    //Kamran
  8. Offline

    ThraxDalgren

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    Well the open-hand form I look forward to learning the most is Tiger-Crane. But the weapon form I look forward to is double broadsword. :)
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    LoneTiger Allumni

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    Ng Ying Kuen (5 animals fist set) Is the set that is used in braches of Hung Ga decended from GM Tang Fung.

    Sup Ying Kuen (five animals, five elements) is the form usualy performed by those decended from GM Lam Sai Wings side of the Hung Ga family.

    To the best of my knowledge Ng Ying was the original and Sup Ying is a later development.

    However its certainly not unheard of for practioners from either ancestory to practice either or both forms. There is also some form of personal preference involved.

    So basicaly you have

    'Lau Gar Kuen' (Lau Family fist) - not practiced in all linages

    'Gung Gi Fook Fu' (Training I shape tiger) - nearly all linages though performance varys a LOT.

    'Fu Hok Sung Ying Kuen' (tiger crane synthesis fist) - all linages decended though Wong Fai Hung have this form as it was his invention. It is more standardised than the others but great variation is still seen.

    'Ng Ying Kuen' (five formed fist) - usualy found in older Hung schools and those decened from GM Tang Fung linages.

    'Sup Ying Kuen' (ten formed fist) - synthesis of Ng Ying Kuen with elemental boxing. The animal sections in this form are more pronounced and the whole form is longer in general.

    'Tit Sing Kuen' (Iron wire fist) - found in most hung schools decened from Wong Fai Hung. This form was taught to Wong by Tit Kiew Sam who was one of the famous Ten Tigers of Canton. This is an OLD form dating back to the shaolin temple so there is SOME chance this form exists in parts in other systems as well.

    All of this however is 'Canton' Hung Ga. There are whole other linages of Hung that dont use these forms and have very different movement and form structures. Modern Canton Hung Ga is very influenced by Wong Fai Hung and his many studies.

    The 'four pillars' of Canton Hung Ga are considered 'gung gi, fu hok, ng ying or sup ying, tit sing.

    Still again there are LOTS of other hung ga players around.

    My sigungs father was even a master of a Northern variant:confused:

    Ok thats enough babble for me, havent posted on Hung for a while :)
  10. Offline

    ThraxDalgren

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    Another thing I find interesting about the school/lineage of hung gar that I train in is that we have a seperate form for each animal. So Tiger has it's own form (with about 60 techniques), and so does, leopard, and crane, etc etc. But we also have the 5animal/5 elements form, which is just one, very long form.

    I've heard that schools that have a seperate form for each of the animals are referred to as Ha Say Fu lineages. But usually these schools do not have a 5animal/5 elements form, which we do. Very confusing at times. Oh well, I love it nonetheless :)
  11. Offline

    KitKamran

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    ....

    people exchange forms, techniques, etc...stuff happens. Ha Say Fu has a hand form for each of the 5 animals(tiger,crane,leopard,snake,dragon), it has also been said that some lineages from taiwan have a unique form for each animal that is not Ha Say Fu.
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    suckrazor

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    a little off topic but my fav hung gar site is www.hungga.net it has lots of form posters, videos and such for download

    it also has lots of good info
  13. Offline

    Vornth

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    ......

    Originally posted by KitKamran

    lau gar is a style in and of itself. The style more or less died out around the same time that Wong(Huang) Fei Hung lived. Since then it has been incorporated into the Hung Gar system.

    Hiya.

    Seeing as I study Lau Gar in England, and have done so for many years, I'd have to disagree that it's died out in its own right, and is now only part of Hung Gar!

    Our Master Yau lives in and works from Birmingham, in the English Midlands, and we have many clubs throughout the country. See www.laugar-kungfu.com for more details :)

    Blessings.

    Vornth
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    Jeff C. Allumni

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    Death of Lau Gar?

    Vornth,

    The only place where you can learn Lau Gar these days as a complete style seems to be in England.I don't think he meant it was gone completely,but it's taught as part of Hung Gar and other styles pretty much everywhere else.I actually learned Lau Gar Kune at my Southern Longfist school.It was the second form taught at the school.

    Also one of my favorites:D

    jeff:)
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    Vornth

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    Hiya Jeff.

    Yes - Kit and I have discussed before about Lau Gar being 'absorbed' into other styles - particularly, I think, in Kit's native country.

    It really is an excellent style - lots of complicated fist forms and stable stances, using traditional KF animals, with a sprinkling of nice kicks too - including, as you yourself already know, the basic kicks plus some nice crescent ones, spinning and jumping ones too.

    I'm glad that you have fond memories of the style - it is the best I have ever studied, although, given the chance, I would love to study traditional Shaolin style to go along with it :)

    As for actual Hung Gar, I know almost nothing of this style - but it seems to be quite popular here on Dragon's List.

    Blessings.

    Vornth
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    Jeff C. Allumni

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    but it seems to be quite popular here on Dragon's List.

    Vornth,

    Lau Gar is a very nice system.Also Hung Gar is very popular at every forum i visit.I really never used to care for the two styles back when i was learning Bak sil Lum (N,Shaolin).I thought Southern China styles except for Choy Lay Fut ,and Cheung Kune Pai were very boring and lack flash.

    Now that i've learned some Lau Gar and Black Tiger i see how wrong i was.I now am sold on Southern styles.i like all kung fu ,but i lean towards Southern styles.

    Plus i live in "The Dirty South" :D

    jeff:)
  17. Offline

    Vornth

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    Ho Ho Jeff - you've made me think...

    Without wanting to a) raise a whole 'geographicalist' debate, and also b) straying TOO far from the topic for TOO long:-

    Where I come from (England) Northerners are seen as the tougher guys (like me ho ho) and dwellers in Southern England referred to variously as softies and pansies (not saying that I agree with this myself, he hastily states...)

    So it came as a bit of a shock years ago, when I heard that Southern KF was called 'hard', and Northern 'soft'.

    It must be a hemisphere thing, or summink :brow:

    Blessings.

    Vornth
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    Jeff C. Allumni

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    I've never heard that one.

    Vornth ,

    I've always heard the one about Southern Fists and Northern Kicks.Because in Southern China the land was rocky and the ppl were smaller ,and needed to be able to fight on boats,thus the deeper stances and more fist techniques.In Northern China the ppl were taller and the land more flat ,thus the longrange techniques and more kicks.

    I never heard that about England either. :D

    Although i've heard alot about the toughness of the Irish and Scotts.:eek:

    jeff:)
  19. Offline

    Vornth

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    Yeah - you've got to be a bit daft to pick a fight with a Scotsman - they're made out of solid granite and fight a 'beserker' style rather than scientific MA :bang:

    However - they can be your best friend as well as your worst enemy.

    Now, what was this thread about again...:D

    Blessings.

    Vornth
  20. Offline

    Jeff C. Allumni

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    :hscratch:

    jeff:)

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