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The Rokkishu / Tensho / Bubishi Connection

Discussion in 'Others' started by Tsuruken, Oct 8, 2001.

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    Tsuruken Allumni

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    Article 20 of the ancient "Bubishi" contains an illustration of six hand forms known as the Six Qi Hands of the Shaolin Style" or "Shaolin Liu Liangqishu". In Japanese this is known as "Roku Ichi Ki Shu" or "Rokkishu". History states that the founder of Gojuryu Karatedo, Miyagi Chojun (1888-1953) with the assistance of ****o-Ryu founder Mabuni Kenwa (1889-1952) developed a kata by the name of "Tensho" (rolling hands) based upon the diagrams contained within Chapter 20 the 'Bubishi". It is reported that Miyagi Sensei had taken the hand-forms from the pages of the "Bubishi" combining them with the footwork and basic pattern of the Paipuren kata in developing this 'new-old' form. It is though that the original kata was performed using lower stances similar in fashion to that of the Chinese Hung-Gar Gongfu ("Red Clan" Kung Fu) style. This "Tensho" kata was introduced into Miyagi Gojuryu and Mabuni ****oryu in the late 1920's. The "Bubishi Myth" has always frustrated me. My teacher (Yabiku Takaya Sensei) told me that it was basically a "uso" (lie) spread out of stylistic propoganda in order to make a stronger connection to the treasured "Bubishi".I beleive the form itself owe's its origins to an older Chinese Fujian Crane form (Flying Crane/Feeding Crane) and that Miyagi transposed it's movements with the stepping methods of Paipuren to formulate that now known as "Tensho". The similarities between the Goju Tensho and Shihequan's "8 Shapes of the Hand" and Feihequan's "8 Continious Linking Steps" is hard to ignore and offers (in my humble opinion) a more accurate account for it's origins. I believe that looking to the Chinese arts which had a erratic influence on the development of Karatedo is a way of rediscovering the principles if not the "original" sequences upon which this tradition rests.

    I have only oral history to go on regarding the Ba Jin Shou / Rokkishu we use/teach/practice so it can hardly be viewed as 'fact'. However, their seems to be some truth in this oral transmission as is seen within the kata and a comparison with other systems that may have had an influence on same. Some historians believe that Miyagi Sensei's "Tensho" was actually developed from an older Chinese form. The Gojuryu Kata Tensho, which developed Miyagi Chojun from the Rokkishu and arising from the White Crane displays many aspects of the style the Go Kenki formed with a possible connection to the Fei Hequan (Flying Crane Style) evident within it's techniques. The Kata's essence is to be found within its unique movements which mimic the actions of a Crane flying and the Yuen Dung Yu Hu Xi Fang Fa or "Movement and Breathing Methodology". The kata embodies the concept of Rou Jin (Soft Energy) hand methods (Shou Fa), eye methods (Yan Fa), body methods (ShenFa) and stepping methods (Bu Fa).Whatever the actual 'truth' may be, this form as practiced and taught within the Kokusai Okinawa Butoryu Gohokan Karatedo Kyokai pays homage to the original concepts and hand-forms. Movements are inwards and outwards, downwards and upwards, throwing out ("shooting out") and picking up, relaxed vibration and power. They are performed fast yet fluidly using specific breathing. The form as I know it, commences stepping forward into a Battle Stance (Chien Be) palms facing outwards from which a reverse sanpping Sa****e (Stabbing Hand) is delivered (repeated left and right sides stepping forward). Then the form takes a variation from the "Tensho" in that a supported outside palm-block followed by a supported inside palm-block into a right bent crane-wing/hand is performed and followed by a same arm Palm Edge Strike forward. From here, the same arm performs an inside wing-arm block (like Wing Chun's "Bong Sao") which then flips back outwards into a palm-facing inwards outside block. The same arm is then withdrawn to the lower koshi (hip) and then shoot's upwards in a slicing palm strike. The same hand then pulls back to the hip and then shoots forward into a Shukoken (Rising Crane's Head Strike). This sequence is repeated to the left side and then doubled up with both arms performing the same sequence. One then steps backward performing an inside block into a forward Shukoken and double Nukite. This is repeated to the left side. One then steps forward pressing both hand downwards along the centreline and then outwards three times in double palm-edge strike before pulling back to the chest then outward to the sides of the body in a double crane extends it's wings moveement. This is repeated to the right side. One then steps back performing wave hands like clouds. Stepping back again and repeating. The practitoner steps forward and performs a left Closing Door and then steps forward with a right Closing Door before stepping back to perform a snapping Mawashi-Uchi (Guardian Holds the Tablet) stepping back and repeating to finish with the traditional lifting the bell, striking the bell, Dragon returns to cave salutation.

    The opening sequence indeed contains a myriad of wrist-locks as well as traps, Ch'in-na and the Southern Chinese principle of simulataneous block & strike in one move over that of the more static block ... stop ... strike motions of modern (traditional) karate! The supported outside palm 'block' (similar to Awase-Uke) can double as a check and simultaneous palm strike (against say a right hand punch) with the next move of the inside supported palm 'block' acting as an inner swiping/cutting hand strike (lead hand) and the supporting hand following in a Shuto.

    The importance and secretiveness of this practice is paramount as most of Crane-Fist advanced techniques are hidden within the 8 Shapes of the Hand. The techniques within this unique and obviously Crane-Fist derived kata when properly executed will drain the opponents "Qi" while transmitting one's own energy into the strike. Gokenki taught this kata to Kana Kinjo and Wong O'gan Pyon in the 1920's in the tea shop Dojo, where Gokenki taught selected Okinawan karateka. Mr. Kinjo taught Rokkishu to Takaya Yabiku in 1969. This kata is a must for understanding the system of Gokenki.

    One may note the similarity between the "Battle Posture" posture and that seen within the Uechiryu Karate style. This is more than just plain coincidence as the Uechiryu style shares many of the signature characteristics of the Kingairyu style passed on by the late Matayoshi Shimpo Sensei. In 1962, Master Matayoshi had just returned to live in Okinawa from Kawasaki in mainland Japan. Master Matayoshi Shinpo's father was a close friend and business associate of Gokenki. Gokenki was a frequent house guest of the Matayoshi family until he permanently moved to Okinawa. He married an Okinawan lady and raised a family in Okinawa, who are still living there today. When Master Matayoshi Shinpo was young his father asked Master Go Kenki to teach him the Kingairyu katas. Sometimes they were referred to as "Tsuru" (Crane), but Master Matayoshi Shinpo always insisted that they are not, because, "Kin Gai" means "Golden Rooster". Many people who learned from Master Go Kenki have called his katas "Hakutsuru", but he didn't practice "White Crane", he only taught Golden Rooster. According to master Matayoshi Shinpo, Gokenki's kata were only ever referred to as "Golden" never "White". One can only guess that due to the popularity of the "White Crane" art at that time many Okinawan teachers used the term to describe Gokenki's forms. After studying the Kingairyu kata, one comes to realise that they contain hundreds of applications which made the kata seem like they have many variations of the one form. That's why, when Gokenki performed the kata, he never did the same sequence twice as he was bringing out the "Chii" or "spirit" of the kata in much the same way that an traditional Okinawa Kaminchu (priest) would embody the essence of those who have gone before. This posture is seen within a wide number of the Butoryu Ó Kata including Paipuren (8 Steps/Strikes), Ba Jin Shou (8 Energy Hands), Kingai (Gold Bird), and Kokuokakuken (Royal Crane-Fist).

    Regards,

    Ron Goninan
  2. Offline

    DanBockjr

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    half a response

    I think that Mas Oyamas sensei Yamaguchi's books would have the answers your looking for. in regards to the calling the kata as golden and not white either would have been correct i thinks a matter of personal opinion by the writers or tellers of the system. miagi was taught by chinese artists as were many other okinawans.



    this is my theory on this subject no a fact since i am not that well versed in japanese martial arts but here it goes. traditionally the chinese practiced their arts for roughly 20 years before you could effectively learn a complete system by their standard at least the wutang guys anyway (not alot of shaolin background here).



    as the okinawans and some japanese came over in search of jobs better fishing whatever their reason they usually stayed a few years and went home . so due to the fact that modernization started comming about and time suddenly became money: they could only stay and learn for short periods of time or their families would suffer.



    so with only a few years of instruction they smartly completed thier systems with old fashoned ingenuity and improvisation;thus giving the Jimi handrix syndrome to the kata you speak of. forced famine and illiteracy didnt help keep the written aspects in line either. un foretunatly guns in your face have a very powerful effect no matter how strong your martial skills are. i will ask around about the rest of the information ill have a more ample answer for you asap
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    tsronaldo

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    Good post. I appriciate it

    pret personnel en ligne - Pret personnel en ligne et de comparer les meilleurs taux afin de... La demande de prêt personnel en ligne



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    Bancato

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