Wu Ch'uan-yu started studying T'ai Chi Ch'uan in his capacity as an officer cadet of the Palace Battalion of the Ch'ing (Qing) dynasty's Imperial Guards under Yang Lu-ch'an (1799-1872) in 1850. He became a disciple of Yang's son, Yang Pan-hou (1837-1890) and was known as a specialist in the "soft" neutralisation of incoming attacks. He was given permission by the Yangs to teach his own students in 1870.


John Winglock Ng

Dr. Winglock Ng was born in 1950 in Fukien China. At that time it was the beginning of the cultural revolution, marking the beginning of the "10 Dark Years" of Chinese history. Life was difficult, his mother and father fled from the mainland and left him to be raised by his grandparents or all that they owned would be confiscated by the government. His grandfather was a common man, a broom maker who studied "The 6 Harmony Monkey Style" from his father before him. As was taught to him, he decided to share his family style with his grandson. Dr.


chow gar hands

According to Chow Gar tradition, the founder of the style was Chow Ah Naam who lived in the 1800s. He had spent many years in the Southern Shaolin Monastery under the guidance of the abbot Sim See Yan. He created a new style which he called Praying Mantis from watching a fight between a praying mantis and a bird. His style is not related to the Northern Praying Mantis created by Wang Lang during the Song Dynasty (960-1279). Ah Naam taught the style to many people in the region and one of his students was Wong Fook Go.


choy li fut

Choy Li Fut was founded in 1836 by Chan Heung, a well-known and highly-skilled martial artist of that period. Also known as Din Ying and Daht Ting, Chan Heung was born on August 23, 1806 (7 moon 10th day of 1806 of the lunar calendar), in King Mui (Jing Mei), a village in the San Woi (Xin Hui) district of Guangdong province. His martial arts career began at age seven, when he went to live with his uncle, Chan Yuen-Woo. Yuen-Woo was a famous boxer from the legendary Shaolin temple in Fujian, China.


hsing i

Major weapons are knife (tao) and sword (chien). It uses single movements in training, repeated on both left and right sides, and contains short basic forms, unlike other northern systems.

Important figures in the Hepei style (San-Shih original style) are Li-Tsun-I, San-Yuen-Shiang, Tsau-Ke-Li, Chiao-Liang-Feng and Adam Hsu.


 
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