tai chi at sunset

Whatever theory you believe, it is well known that Ch'en-Chia-Kou is well known as the first t'ai-chi-ch'uan master.


The origin of Pa-Kua is unknown, however it IS known the Tung Hai-ch'uan (A.D. 1798-1879) of Wenan Hsien in Hopei province during the Ch'ing Dynasty learned this art from an anonymous man then barely in his 20's. Tung is reputed to have been nearly dead of starvation when the hermit found him. The Taoist ministered to him, and Tung remained with him several years learning a 'divine' boxing.


Every one of us has at some point ventured down to the local bookstore and picked out a specific martial arts text that we think will change our outlook. Several weeks after finishing the book it begins to collect dust on a table or on a shelf along with other remnants of similar experiences. Forms are usually no different.


An old photograph showing Sifu Wong (in his teens) performing a Hoong Ka kungfu set with his master, Sifu Lai Chin Wah, popularly known as Uncle Righteousness (middle behind in white T-shirt), looking on.

An art is best learnt in its culture. One remarkable difference between the culture of the east and the west is the respect shown to a master. In this connection I have little complaint because my students, from both the east and the west, generally show much respect to me. But I have met many eastern masters commenting on the lack of respect, sometimes utter disrespect, shown to them. Often it is because of the western students' ignorance of eastern ways rather than their willful discourtesy that their eastern masters of chi kung or kung fu (including taijiquan) regard as disrespect.


While sticks and stones can break your bones, your words may actually kill you. They can also save your life. Having to be right despite the cost, reacting indignantly in the face of a threat, or insulting an adversary often guarantees that a conflict will escalate to violence. Clever words, on the other hand, can de-escalate a tense situation, stave off bloodshed until help arrives, momentarily distract an opponent to facilitate your counterattack and escape, or create sympathetic witnesses who will testify on your behalf.

Famous last words will kill you


 
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